Factors to Consider When Building an ADA Compliant Dressing Room

The ADA Act was created to provide fair and equal treatment to people with disabilities. This legislation covers everything from construction to public transport and employment. Many of these principles have been established to allow wheelchair users easy access to buildings, paths, toilets, changing rooms, and more.

If you plan to build an accessible facility for people with disabilities, you should learn a few things. Among the regions where the impact of ADA is most often seen is that of vanity. ADA compliant locker rooms are usually located right next to traditional locker rooms in most retail stores. These locker rooms are specially equipped for wheelchair customers and are therefore also controlled by part 4.35 of the ADA code.

Cabinet

Enough Space

One of the basic principles of Part 4.35 must be about space. The dressing room floor must be unobstructed and provide sufficient space to allow a wheelchair to move around in the dressing room. Wheelchairs must make a 180-degree turn after entering the door and must have enough space to make the same 180-degree turn at the exit.

Appropriate Benches

Dressing rooms should also have appropriate benches. Most curtains are usually closed, do not take up much space, and usually do not have a 180-degree rotation. Finally, dressing rooms must meet the 32-inch width requirements for a wheelchair. Finally, these benches must have back support that can be as simple as using one of the existing walls in your dressing area.

Adequate Door

White ADA dressing rooms must also have an adequate door opening. Many locker rooms are often equipped with sliding or hinged doors, which can also work with an ADA-compliant living area. The key point to remember is that these doors cannot swing in the locker room mentioned.

This usually means that the hinged doors must appear to open so that the 180-degree turn can be made in the locker room without any problems. This is one of the things you should really keep an eye on when building an ADA compliant dressing room. Because some disabled person uses wheelchair, so you need to make sure that it could fit.

Catherine Fossum

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